auld lang syne


auld lang syne
n. times long past.
Etymology: Sc., = old long since: also as the title and refrain of a song

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\\|ōˌlaŋˈzīn, |ōlˌlaŋ-, |ōlˌdaŋ-, -aiŋ- also |ōlˌdla- or |ȯl- or |äl- or |ȧl- or -ˈsīn\ noun
Etymology: Scots, old long ago
: the good old times

let's drink to auld lang syne

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/awld" lang zuyn", suyn"/, Scot. and North Eng.
1. old times, esp. times fondly remembered.
2. old or long friendship.
[lit., old long since, i.e., old long-ago (days)]

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auld lang syne
Long ago (literally, old long since)
• • •
Main Entry:auld

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Auld Lang Syne UK [ˌɔːld læŋ ˈzaɪn] US [ˌɔld læŋ ˈzaɪn]
a Scottish song that people sing at midnight on new year’s eve , when the new year begins
Cultural note
When singing this song, you stand in a circle, cross your arms over, and shake the hands of the people on each side of you. Auld Lang Syne means ‘for old time’s sake’. http://www.macmillandictionary.com/med2cd/weblinks/auld-lang-syne.htm
Thesaurus: specific songshyponym

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auld lang syne «LD lang SYN, ZYN»,
Scottish. old times; long ago in one's life.
Auld Lang Syne,
an old Scottish song with words reworked by Robert Burns, sung at partings, reunions, and New Year.

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[ôld lang 'zīn]
n. times long past
Origin:
late 18th cent.: Scots (see , lang syne). The phrase was popularized as the title and refrain of a song by Robert Burns (1788)

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/ˌoʊldˌlæŋˈzaın/ noun [singular]
: the good old times

They drank a toast to auld lang syne.

Auld lang syne comes from the name of a Scottish song that is traditionally sung at midnight on New Year's Eve.

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auld lang syne [ˌɔːld læŋ ˈsaɪn] [ˌɔːld læŋ ˈsaɪn] noun
an old Scottish song expressing feelings of friendship, traditionally sung at midnight on New Year's Eve
 
Word Origin:
[auld lang syne] late 18th cent.: Scots (from Scots auld ‘old’ and archaic Scottish lang syne ‘times gone by’). The phrase was popularized as the title and refrain of a song by Robert Burns (1788).

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

Synonyms: